Saturday, July 26, 2008

Track 4:-->"Icy Blue Heart" - John Hiatt - (Slow Turning) - (1988)

"She came onto him like a slow movin' cold front.
His beer was warmer than the look in her eyes.
She sat on a stool...
He said, "What do you want?"
She said, "Give me a love that don't freeze up inside."
John Hiatt

This is the musical medicine I take when I'm coming loose. Feeling out of step.

When I need the occasional, but necessary, emotional jumpstart...to feel connected with the world again.

John Hiatt provides the perfect prescription with his joyous and sometimes heart-aching classic..."Slow Turning" (1988).

Up-tempo songs like "Drive South"..."Trudy And Dave"..."Georgia Rae" are guaranteed to throw a smile on your face.

Wonderful ballads like "Is Anybody There"..."Feels Like Rain"..."Icy Blue Heart" hits the mark.

And crank-it numbers like "Slow Turning"..."Ride Along"..."Paper Thin" balances it all out.

John Hiatt - "Slow Turning" on Letterman

Filled with clever metaphors and similes, infectious Hiatt paints twelve solid songs with precise emotional strokes...assuring his listeners will experience a shared...head-nodding understanding.

Track 4 is "Icy Blue Heart"...a beautifully sad ballad about two love-jaded strangers meeting at a bar. Unforgettable!

John Hiatt music is made for warm summer drives and cool house parties. A lost classic.
Good stuff!

Casey

John Hiatt:-->"Icy Blue Heart" (Slow Turning) (1988) (Must Own)

Monday, July 21, 2008

Book Buzz:-->"365 Days" by Ronald J. Glasser (1971)

"Cause I know you'll live forever.
And I know we're still together...
through your music and your love.
Take me back."
38 Special


NO SPOILERS:
The title refers to the amount of time a soldier...drafted or otherwise...had to pull in Vietnam before being allowed to return home.

Ronald J. Glasser...an Army doctor during the Vietnam War...recounts the physical and mental challenges young combat veterans regularly faced...through his all-to-intimate conversations with injured soldiers he tried to mend.

Dr. Glasser also learned quickly how a diagnosis and recommendation for an injured soldier could sometimes create negative consequences.

For instance, a soldier might lose some or all his days served if sent home early to recuperate.
Thus, many doctors tried to loophole this unfair treatment, especially when a hurt soldier was close to his end of tour.
"365 Days" (288 pages) reads very fast and leaves the reader with a dreadful sense of helplessness.

A powerful account of the various angles of the Vietnam War.
Good stuff!


MoSkeet

"Special Delivery"
(1977)...was the second album by southern rock band... 38 Special. They were still honing their sound...not breaking big until 1980's..."Rockin' Into The Night".

Led by Donnie Van Zant (younger brother of the great Ronnie Van Zant) "...Delivery" has a more earthy southern crunch...not feeling over-produced and calculated as some of their later arena-anthems would.
Sadly, not available on CD...yet...but certainly should be.
Good stuff!

38 Special:-->"Take Me Back" (Special Delivery) (1977)
(Must Own)

Monday, July 14, 2008

DVD Pick:-->"People Will Talk" (1951)

"Und now,
are you ready for this one?
You will like it, kiddies.
We present for your fervent felicitations,
the fabulous, futuristic, far-fetched feats
of the fearless Fidgety Queen!"
Nektar


NO SPOILERS:
Often lost in the film shuffle, Director Joseph Mankiewicz (winner of 2 best director Oscars) creates an odd dramedy/comedy in his 1951... "People Will Talk".

Cary Grant...this time cast as the unbelievable caregiver...Dr. Pretorious.

Again, Grant plays the pompous character he has come to define so well...and solves medical problems in a rather unconventional, if not far-fetched manner.

Far-fetched, perhaps...but Cary Grant pulls it off where lesser actors might have failed.

Although beloved by most of the medical staff, jealousy still rears its green, quirky head in the form of Professor Elwell, played by the great character actor Hume Cronyn.

While Cronyn tries to uncover dirt on the good doctor...Pretorious is busy mending a particularly sensitive problem at hand. Oh...and he also finds time to conduct the hospital band.
Hume Cronyn & Margaret Hamilton
Adding mystery to this dramedy...is a peculiar tag-along bloke who rarely leaves the doctor's side. (Wait till you hear the explanation for this one!)

This all adds up to a surprisingly entertaining movie in spite of the film's lack of a healthy dose of reality.

MUST SEE MOMENTS:
Watch for the wonderful...Margaret Hamilton...in a cool cameo.

Enjoy the deliciously absurd argument revolving around an intricately...detailed train set. "Beep! Beep!".

Good Stuff.

Casey

One of my favorite albums from my parent's extensive collection...is by the classic German prog-band...Nektar.

Admittedly, it was the album cover from Nektar's... "Down To Earth" (1974) that made this five year old...(at the time)...pick it up and beg my dad to play it. But it was their unique sound that held my attention.
"Down To Earth" was a concept album using the circus as a metaphor about one's journey through life. (I think). Anyway...I have since listened to many other Nektar albums and have become a fan.

I'm saddened that Nektar never realized the success that a few "lesser bands" have achieved.

Much of Nektar's catalog is available to download at e-music.

Good Stuff!
(Import Only)
Nektar:-->"Fidgety Queen" (Down To Earth) (1974) (Must Own)

Wednesday, July 9, 2008

Track 4:-->"Child Of The Novelty" - Mahogany Rush - (Child Of The Novelty) - (1974)

"Well he loved and laughed and floated past
the echoes of a velvet mind.
That whispered fairy tales untold ...
That kissed his mind, caressed his soul."
Mahogany Rush"


Mahogany Rush...led by guitar buzzmeister Frank Marino...was/is a classic psychedelic blues/rock band heavily influenced by the legendary Jimi Hendrix.

And listening to this 1974 offering...one can easily hear the vocal cantation and guitar stylings of Jimi.

However, Marino shreds and caresses with his own throwback guitar magic and gives the listener ten original tracks that will pleasantly surprise the uninitiated.

"Chains Of Space" quickly comes to mind as well as "Talkin' 'Bout A Feelin"...being lost classics in need of rediscovery.

Track 4 is "Child Of The Novelty"...a gentle tale about a young man's innocence and the ugly world of greed-leeches. I didn't want to like this one for some reason...but I had this song swirling in my brain for days after hearing it for the first time. Pretty nice.

Heavily into LSD in the early '70s....Marino named his band after a particularly vivid...trip.
The album cover was Marino's attempt at sharing his acid journey.

"Child of the Novelty"  -  Mahogany Rush (1974)

Good stuff 

Casey Chambers 
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